Tag Archives: Business

Can you be agile and compliant? – Stuart Ward, IDBS , Agile Business 2016

Can you be agile and compliant? – Stuart Ward, IDBS

Introductory

What happens when you take an organisation, which has been using waterfall for 25 years, to the new world of agile? In 2015, IDBS transformed how it creates software, which is used by a number of business verticals including regulated pharmaceutical environments, to facilitate R&D. This session will show how the move to agile was implemented along with the benefits and challenges seen.    

IDBS produces software for a number of business verticals, which includes regulated environments (GxP and 21 CFR Part 11) in the pharmaceutical industry, to facilitate R&D.

At the beginning of 2015 IDBS’ 100 strong Product Delivery team (Developers, Testers & Business Analysts) moved exclusively to an agile engineering culture. This was a massive change to the organisation which had used a waterfall approach up to that point.

There were big questions around whether the move to agile would impact software quality, speed to market and the overall effectiveness of IDBS’ Product Delivery organisation. Would the Product Managers get the products that they needed and on time? What would be the impact on IDBS’ customers and the rest of the organisation? Did IDBS have the skills and capacity to run agile development teams and how would people need to adapt?

On top of all of this, IDBS had a robust quality management process, would the change to agile affect the outcome of customer audits? Would the software still meet regulatory needs? The expectations were high and everyone was watching!

The move to agile has had a positive and significant impact on IDBS and the way it does business. There have been challenges along the way: some obvious and some surprising. More than 12 months on from the initial change, agile is still impacting how IDBS creates and sells software: from the adoption of new product delivery tools/processes to drive efficiency, to how the customer facing parts of the organisation present and use the software. This session will present how IDBS approached the move to agile and what has happened in the new world.

Stuart is Head of Business Analysis, responsible for ensuring that IDBS products meet the needs of customers. He has grown the Business Analysis team so that it can provide the necessary domain experience required by the agile development teams to create software which can facilitate R&D.

Before starting this role in January 2014, he was Product Manager for E-WorkBook for four years and worked in IDBS Global Professional Services for five years, responsible for deploying IDBS’ products both from a technical and project management perspective.

Prior to working at IDBS, Stuart completed a Post-Doctoral fellowship at the NIH and then worked for Ionix Pharmaceuticals. Stuart obtained his PhD in Pharmacology from the MRC National Institute for Medical Research (University of London).

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The Agile Business – DSDM – Ed Holt – Agile Business 2016

The Agile Business – DSDM – Ed Holt
Agile on the Beach 2016

SLIDES

With the advent of the inter-connected ‘Digital Age’ there is growing pressure on the wider business (beyond IT) to act in a nimble, responsive, agile way – and this represents an essential opportunity to become ‘The Agile Business’. Ed was the Founding Chairman of the DSDM Consortium and was closely involved in its early work as an IT-focussed method. He has recently been undertaking market research on the spread and scope of ‘agile’ into the wider enterprise. This session summarises the findings and points the way for organisations to collaborate to create ‘The Agile Business’.

The Agile Business
The DSDM Consortium is rooted in the promotion of a framework and agile techniques for the delivery of IT projects, and has a successful 20 year track record of thought leadership and practical deliverables. With the advent of the inter-connected ‘Digital Age’ there is growing pressure on the wider business (beyond IT) to act in a nimble, responsive, agile way – and this represents an opportunity to support ‘The Agile Business’.
Ed was the Founding Chairman of the DSDM Consortium and was closely involved in its early work as an IT-focussed method. He has recently been undertaking market research on the spread and scope of ‘agile’ into the wider enterprise.
He will start with a presentation of the market research, leading to a workshop session, with discussion on range of topics including:
*        The DSDM Consortium – Timeline
*        The Context: Drivers for C-Level Executives
*        Definition of the ‘Agile Organisation’
*        Findings from Academic Research
*        The Business Benefits of Organisational Agility
*        Critical Factors in Agile
*        Supply Side: Agile Service Providers
*        Potential Agile Market Offers
*        Open Discussion

Ed is a ‘seasoned’ (ie old!) executive with a 30 year track record in the software industry covering both large scale applications (at IBM leader MSA) and software development (4GL / OO / Component / CASE – you name it!). He was instrumental in the founding of the DSDM Consortium over 20 years ago, when it led the drive for responsive software development – this was the very early days of ‘agile’ even though it wasn’t called that in those days!
Since 1994 the not-for-profit Consortium has been evolving an industry standard for building IT systems in an iterative (agile) way. The Consortium was set up by a small group of suppliers and customers at a time when Agile methodology was a niche approach to running projects, but DSDM wanted to prove to a wider audience that an Agile approach can deliver the business value from projects that bosses demand. And in the last 20 years there have been hundreds of organisations of all sizes running thousands of projects using DSDM to great effect, delivering what the users wanted in a responsive manner.
As first chairman of the consortium, Ed now sees a trend to take Agile into the wider business, beyond ‘just’ IT projects

Next conference :

www.agileonthebeach.co.uk
6-7 July 2017
Cornwall UK

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Value – Andrea Provaglio – Agile Business 2016

Value – Andrea Provaglio, Agile Transformation Coach

Value  –  Andrea Provaglio, Agile Transformation Coach

 

Intermediate

A voyage into the multidimensional, systemic and subjective nature of Value in software development, with the intent of providing ways to create a shared understanding of what’s “valuable” for all stakeholders.

In Agile we like to deliver valuable software to our customers on a regular basis. However, while it’s pretty clear what ‘software’ means, we cannot really say the same about ‘valuable’. The definition of Value in a project (with an uppercase “V”) is frequently fuzzy and confused.

Even within the same project, asking different stakeholders what Value means to them produces different answers; and the same stakeholder will likely provide different definitions of Value, depending on their perception and role in the project.

Most stakeholders will naturally associate Value to money, sometimes through surprisingly creative correlations; but there are other dimensions, equally valid, such as strategic positioning, company image, innovation and learning, and so forth.

Understanding the multidimensional nature of Value becomes therefore critical to drive the project to success.

However, the traditional approach to defining value stems either from a financial mindset or from and engineering mindset, and both may turn out to be incomplete or inadequate to address the complexity of the Agile projects we face and of the ecosystem in which they exist.
In this talk we’ll address what Value means in Agile for different stakeholders; how to map and categorize the stakeholders; how to describe Value on different dimension and how to track it; how to bring system awareness to your project’s definition of value. We’ll also see what happens when we don’t do that.

Andrea Provaglio : I help IT organizations to implement better ways of doing business; and I coach executives, managers and teams who want to improve technically and relationally.

My main focus is on helping companies to transition to organizational and cultural models that are better suited to the kind of knowledge work that’s so typical of software development — which includes, but it’s not limited to, Agile and Lean.

In over 20 years of professional experience, I had clients in three different continents and I worked with organizations ranging from the United Nations to small and dynamic IT companies.

Currently I work in Europe. I’ve also worked in the USA on a O-1 visa for “extraordinary abilities in Sciences”

As part of my regular activities, I enjoy sharing what I know by speaking at major international conferences. http://andreaprovaglio.com/about

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Being Agile: business survival essentials – Marc Heasman, Kainos, Agile Business 2016

Being Agile: business survival essentials – Marc Heasman, Kainos, Agile Business 2016

Being Agile: business survival essentials – Marc Heasman, Kainos

The world of business is changing faster than ever. Digital start-ups are re-shaping long established industries with innovative business models and services that better meet customers’ needs. Companies that fail to respond to the challenge are falling by the wayside, with many high street names amongst the list of casualties.

This talk will discuss the drivers for digital transformation, including the use Agile to achieve the business flexibility required in the digital age. Highlighting the increasing use of mobile, it will outline the changing expectations of customers in how services are delivered and illustrate the impact on those businesses that have failed to respond. Identifying some of the dramatic shifts in market competition seen across many industries, we will discuss the imperative for digital transformation. Then, drawing from the practices of some of the world’s most successful digital businesses, we will describe the key features now increasingly essential to business survival, covering:

–         Customer focus
–         Service agility
–         Data exploitation
–         Technology maximization
–         Systematic innovation
–         Digital skills
–         Experimental culture

At the end of the session, participants will have the opportunity to reflect on their own businesses and how they are using Agile to achieve broader digital transformation.

Digital technologies are not only radically changing how services are delivered, but they are fueling changes to customer demands and opening markets to new competition. Adopting an Agile approach to software development is one way in which organizations can increase their flexibility and respond to these changes, but on its own this isn’t enough. This talk will explore the drivers and features of digital transformation needed to survive in today’s ever-changing business landscape.

Marc is a leader in digital transformation and has a strong background in public service strategy and delivery. Having led Agile development on one of the Government’s 25 exemplar digital programmes, he combines practical experience with academic study from the Academy of Digital Business Leaders. He joined Kainos in September 2015 and is currently supporting DVSA’s digital transformation of its MOT Testing Service.

Kainos is a high growth, UK-based provider of IT services, consulting and software solutions. The Group specialises in the development of digital technology solutions; software design and agile software development; automated testing services; technology support services; and related ancillary services such as project management, all provided across multiple sectors.

 

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Agile accountants and other rare specimen – Corinna Baldauf – Business 2016

Agile accountants and other rare specimen – Corinna Baldauf, sipgate

Introductory

Tired of IT being an agile island? At sipgate, the agile mindset spread to all parts of the company: from HR over Accounting to kitchen staff. Let’s explore 10 examples of how agile thinking manifests throughout everyday company life. Look forward to strategy retreats for all, pairing everywhere, peer feedback and many more!    

Tired of IT being an agile island? At sipgate, the agile mindset spread to all parts of the company: from HR over Accounting to kitchen staff. Let’s explore 10 examples of how agile thinking manifests throughout everyday company life. Look forward to strategy retreats for all, pairing everywhere, peer feedback and many more!

Corinna Baldauf [http://finding-marbles.com/] has tried on every Scrum role for size and is happiest as a developer. She strives to make things useful, simple and beautiful for sipgate.de [http://sipgate.de] and as well as her private projects.

Her most popular creation is Retromat [http://plans-for-retrospectives.com/]. She hopes that Wall-Skills.com [http://wall-skills.com/] will be equally well known some day.

If you want to make Corinna laugh, tell her a pun. Any pun will do, even bad ones. Okay, especially bad ones. Try it. Just look out for her vibrantly colored hair.

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Agile Marketing: The Incomplete Guide – Gez Smith – Agile Business 2016

Agile Marketing: The Incomplete Guide  –  Gez Smith, Bunny Picnic Ltd

A great session from Gez Smith on Agile Marketing

Agile Marketing: The Incomplete Guide – Gez Smith. Bunny Picnic Ltd –  Slides

 

For years, marketers have used up-front planning and specification to launch campaigns in a single big bang. This worked in predictable and well-understood environments, like TV and press advertising, but the Internet has now made marketing far more complex, fast-paced and uncertain. As a result, the old approaches often don’t work, and the answer may lie in agile.

Based on Gez’s research at Bristol University and 10 years experience of using agile in marketing and comms environments, this talk looks at how agile can be used in marketing, and the potential blockers to making it a reality.

The history of modern marketing and communications can be traced back to the end of World War II, the same time as big waterfall style approaches to delivering projects were being developed in the military, construction and space industries. It seems no coincidence that marketing has been a linear, waterfall-based industry ever since, full of hierarchy, personal opinion, subjective awards and big bang launches. There’s even a whole army of people in marketing departments called ‘planners’.

This was fine when marketing was happening in a stable and predictable environment, with few new channels emerging, and customers consuming your marketing in places you could predict. In the last 10 years though, the rise of digital and the Internet has caused dozens of new channels to emerge, and caused customers to become your media suppliers through sharing your content on social media, all at a much faster pace of change than ever before. On top of this, the rise of mobile means your customers could be consuming your marketing anywhere at any time, and the rise of big data means you can finally target and understand customers to huge degrees of detail and complexity.

Faced with this new complex, fast-paced and uncertain marketing environment, I believe marketers need to adopt the agile mindset software developers have been using to deal with these issues for years. But how does agile work in marketing? If all the agile frameworks are for software development, which one should marketers choose? Do marketers need to invent a whole new framework? Besides, how do you get an industry that always puts the best spin on things to begin to celebrate failure when failing fast?

It seems clear that marketers and communicators moving into digital need to adopt agile. It’s not yet at all clear how they should do so.

agile marketingGez is a Certified Scrum Master and Certified Scrum Professional who has been working with agile and scrum for over 10 years, for clients including 10 Downing Street, the BBC Trust, Lloyds Banking Group and Glastonbury Festival. After two years postgraduate research into agile at Bristol University, from the perspectives of strategy, organizational change, leadership and marketing, in early 2016 he published his second book, titled “Agile Marketing: The Incomplete Guide”. You can download for free from www.bunnypicnic.co.uk/book.

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