Tag Archives: 2016

Can you be agile and compliant? – Stuart Ward, IDBS , Agile Business 2016

Can you be agile and compliant? – Stuart Ward, IDBS

Introductory

What happens when you take an organisation, which has been using waterfall for 25 years, to the new world of agile? In 2015, IDBS transformed how it creates software, which is used by a number of business verticals including regulated pharmaceutical environments, to facilitate R&D. This session will show how the move to agile was implemented along with the benefits and challenges seen.    

IDBS produces software for a number of business verticals, which includes regulated environments (GxP and 21 CFR Part 11) in the pharmaceutical industry, to facilitate R&D.

At the beginning of 2015 IDBS’ 100 strong Product Delivery team (Developers, Testers & Business Analysts) moved exclusively to an agile engineering culture. This was a massive change to the organisation which had used a waterfall approach up to that point.

There were big questions around whether the move to agile would impact software quality, speed to market and the overall effectiveness of IDBS’ Product Delivery organisation. Would the Product Managers get the products that they needed and on time? What would be the impact on IDBS’ customers and the rest of the organisation? Did IDBS have the skills and capacity to run agile development teams and how would people need to adapt?

On top of all of this, IDBS had a robust quality management process, would the change to agile affect the outcome of customer audits? Would the software still meet regulatory needs? The expectations were high and everyone was watching!

The move to agile has had a positive and significant impact on IDBS and the way it does business. There have been challenges along the way: some obvious and some surprising. More than 12 months on from the initial change, agile is still impacting how IDBS creates and sells software: from the adoption of new product delivery tools/processes to drive efficiency, to how the customer facing parts of the organisation present and use the software. This session will present how IDBS approached the move to agile and what has happened in the new world.

Stuart is Head of Business Analysis, responsible for ensuring that IDBS products meet the needs of customers. He has grown the Business Analysis team so that it can provide the necessary domain experience required by the agile development teams to create software which can facilitate R&D.

Before starting this role in January 2014, he was Product Manager for E-WorkBook for four years and worked in IDBS Global Professional Services for five years, responsible for deploying IDBS’ products both from a technical and project management perspective.

Prior to working at IDBS, Stuart completed a Post-Doctoral fellowship at the NIH and then worked for Ionix Pharmaceuticals. Stuart obtained his PhD in Pharmacology from the MRC National Institute for Medical Research (University of London).

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The Agile Business – DSDM – Ed Holt – Agile Business 2016

The Agile Business – DSDM – Ed Holt
Agile on the Beach 2016

SLIDES

With the advent of the inter-connected ‘Digital Age’ there is growing pressure on the wider business (beyond IT) to act in a nimble, responsive, agile way – and this represents an essential opportunity to become ‘The Agile Business’. Ed was the Founding Chairman of the DSDM Consortium and was closely involved in its early work as an IT-focussed method. He has recently been undertaking market research on the spread and scope of ‘agile’ into the wider enterprise. This session summarises the findings and points the way for organisations to collaborate to create ‘The Agile Business’.

The Agile Business
The DSDM Consortium is rooted in the promotion of a framework and agile techniques for the delivery of IT projects, and has a successful 20 year track record of thought leadership and practical deliverables. With the advent of the inter-connected ‘Digital Age’ there is growing pressure on the wider business (beyond IT) to act in a nimble, responsive, agile way – and this represents an opportunity to support ‘The Agile Business’.
Ed was the Founding Chairman of the DSDM Consortium and was closely involved in its early work as an IT-focussed method. He has recently been undertaking market research on the spread and scope of ‘agile’ into the wider enterprise.
He will start with a presentation of the market research, leading to a workshop session, with discussion on range of topics including:
*        The DSDM Consortium – Timeline
*        The Context: Drivers for C-Level Executives
*        Definition of the ‘Agile Organisation’
*        Findings from Academic Research
*        The Business Benefits of Organisational Agility
*        Critical Factors in Agile
*        Supply Side: Agile Service Providers
*        Potential Agile Market Offers
*        Open Discussion

Ed is a ‘seasoned’ (ie old!) executive with a 30 year track record in the software industry covering both large scale applications (at IBM leader MSA) and software development (4GL / OO / Component / CASE – you name it!). He was instrumental in the founding of the DSDM Consortium over 20 years ago, when it led the drive for responsive software development – this was the very early days of ‘agile’ even though it wasn’t called that in those days!
Since 1994 the not-for-profit Consortium has been evolving an industry standard for building IT systems in an iterative (agile) way. The Consortium was set up by a small group of suppliers and customers at a time when Agile methodology was a niche approach to running projects, but DSDM wanted to prove to a wider audience that an Agile approach can deliver the business value from projects that bosses demand. And in the last 20 years there have been hundreds of organisations of all sizes running thousands of projects using DSDM to great effect, delivering what the users wanted in a responsive manner.
As first chairman of the consortium, Ed now sees a trend to take Agile into the wider business, beyond ‘just’ IT projects

Next conference :

www.agileonthebeach.co.uk
6-7 July 2017
Cornwall UK

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Value – Andrea Provaglio – Agile Business 2016

Value – Andrea Provaglio, Agile Transformation Coach

Value  –  Andrea Provaglio, Agile Transformation Coach

 

Intermediate

A voyage into the multidimensional, systemic and subjective nature of Value in software development, with the intent of providing ways to create a shared understanding of what’s “valuable” for all stakeholders.

In Agile we like to deliver valuable software to our customers on a regular basis. However, while it’s pretty clear what ‘software’ means, we cannot really say the same about ‘valuable’. The definition of Value in a project (with an uppercase “V”) is frequently fuzzy and confused.

Even within the same project, asking different stakeholders what Value means to them produces different answers; and the same stakeholder will likely provide different definitions of Value, depending on their perception and role in the project.

Most stakeholders will naturally associate Value to money, sometimes through surprisingly creative correlations; but there are other dimensions, equally valid, such as strategic positioning, company image, innovation and learning, and so forth.

Understanding the multidimensional nature of Value becomes therefore critical to drive the project to success.

However, the traditional approach to defining value stems either from a financial mindset or from and engineering mindset, and both may turn out to be incomplete or inadequate to address the complexity of the Agile projects we face and of the ecosystem in which they exist.
In this talk we’ll address what Value means in Agile for different stakeholders; how to map and categorize the stakeholders; how to describe Value on different dimension and how to track it; how to bring system awareness to your project’s definition of value. We’ll also see what happens when we don’t do that.

Andrea Provaglio : I help IT organizations to implement better ways of doing business; and I coach executives, managers and teams who want to improve technically and relationally.

My main focus is on helping companies to transition to organizational and cultural models that are better suited to the kind of knowledge work that’s so typical of software development — which includes, but it’s not limited to, Agile and Lean.

In over 20 years of professional experience, I had clients in three different continents and I worked with organizations ranging from the United Nations to small and dynamic IT companies.

Currently I work in Europe. I’ve also worked in the USA on a O-1 visa for “extraordinary abilities in Sciences”

As part of my regular activities, I enjoy sharing what I know by speaking at major international conferences. http://andreaprovaglio.com/about

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User testing on a shoestring – Dan Goodwin – Product Design 2016

User testing on a shoestring – Dan Goodwin, fffunction

 

 

User testing on a shoestring – Dan Goodwin, fffunction SLIDES

https://speakerdeck.com/bouncingdan/usability-testing-on-a-shoestring

Introductory

Interactive workshop (no computer)
Double session

Testing whatever you’re working on with real users is one of the best ways to uncover design issues and it doesn’t have to be expensive. Anyone involved in the design and development process for a product or service can run effective user tests if they follow some simple guidelines. This workshop will show you how.   

Testing with real users is a fantastic way to inform the design process for products and services. You can test just about anything at pretty much any point in the lifecycle of a product and learn loads doing it.

User testing can also be a great ‘gateway’ tool for bringing users into the design process. Get folks on your product team to watch a user trying to complete basic tasks with your thing and they’ll not only be stunned and enthused into fixing things, hopefully they’ll also be encouraged to get users at the centre of the design process (where they should be).

And what’s more amazing is that anyone on the team for your thing can run user tests. They don’t need to be expensive, time-consuming and difficult, they can be quick, cheap and easy. There are a few simple guidelines for user tests which apply to cheap, guerrilla tests as much as they do to expensive tests in lab.

This workshop will explain the benefits of user testing and move quickly into showing you how to plan, organise, and conduct a user test and how to share what you learn with your team. You’ll learn how and where user testing can be used, how you can incorporate it into your project methodology, and how it fits alongside other techniques for bringing users into the design process. Low budget tools for capturing, analysing, and sharing user tests (including those on mobile and touch devices) will be discussed. As it’s an interactive workshop, there will be some exercises to get you planning and conducting a user test. There will also be some discussion of what you might get if you take user testing into higher budget territory with participant recruitment, user testing labs and eye-tracking (and why you probably don’t need to).

Dan is the user experience director at fffunction, a user-centred design agency in the South West of the UK. With a background of fifteen years experience in agency and in-house software and web development, he is an all-rounder with strong technical and people skills in addition to user experience. He loves user research and bringing users and empathy for them into every step of a project.

Dan loves the sea and gets in it or near it whenever he gets the chance. He likes good coffee, good beer, and good and bad flapjacks.”

 

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Continuously delivering software to big brands – Paul Boocock – Software Delivery Video 2016

Continuously delivering software to big brands – Paul Boocock

Software Delivery 2016 – Continuously delivering software

The ability to react and deliver working software quickly is a vital component to the way we work. Our clients run some of the biggest brands in the world, so how do we continuously deliver software whilst ensuring we keep our clients happy and our quality high?

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Testing in a Continuous Delivery World – Wouter Lagerweij – Software Delivery 2016

Testing in a Continuous Delivery World – Wouter Lagerweij 

Software Delivery 2016

Hey, do you remember when everyone was asking what the role of the tester would be in an agile team? It’s happening again! A team that releases every commit needs to take testing seriously. That changes the role of the tester once again. And of developers, too. It puts the customer center stage again.
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10% time the pros and cons? -Elizabeth Pope – Software Delivery 2016

10% time the pros and cons? -Elizabeth Pope

Software Delivery 2016

I’m lucky enough to work for a company who offer 10% time, and believe it’s had many benefits for our team including engagement and performance improvements and as a tool for both retainment and attraction. However sometimes it can be hard to keep the business bought in to the idea of a very expensive team doing ‘nothing’ one day a fortnight. I’ll also share tips and tricks to get your team to make the most of their Learning and Development time without telling them what to do!
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