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Can you be agile and compliant? – Stuart Ward, IDBS , Agile Business 2016

Can you be agile and compliant? – Stuart Ward, IDBS

Introductory

What happens when you take an organisation, which has been using waterfall for 25 years, to the new world of agile? In 2015, IDBS transformed how it creates software, which is used by a number of business verticals including regulated pharmaceutical environments, to facilitate R&D. This session will show how the move to agile was implemented along with the benefits and challenges seen.    

IDBS produces software for a number of business verticals, which includes regulated environments (GxP and 21 CFR Part 11) in the pharmaceutical industry, to facilitate R&D.

At the beginning of 2015 IDBS’ 100 strong Product Delivery team (Developers, Testers & Business Analysts) moved exclusively to an agile engineering culture. This was a massive change to the organisation which had used a waterfall approach up to that point.

There were big questions around whether the move to agile would impact software quality, speed to market and the overall effectiveness of IDBS’ Product Delivery organisation. Would the Product Managers get the products that they needed and on time? What would be the impact on IDBS’ customers and the rest of the organisation? Did IDBS have the skills and capacity to run agile development teams and how would people need to adapt?

On top of all of this, IDBS had a robust quality management process, would the change to agile affect the outcome of customer audits? Would the software still meet regulatory needs? The expectations were high and everyone was watching!

The move to agile has had a positive and significant impact on IDBS and the way it does business. There have been challenges along the way: some obvious and some surprising. More than 12 months on from the initial change, agile is still impacting how IDBS creates and sells software: from the adoption of new product delivery tools/processes to drive efficiency, to how the customer facing parts of the organisation present and use the software. This session will present how IDBS approached the move to agile and what has happened in the new world.

Stuart is Head of Business Analysis, responsible for ensuring that IDBS products meet the needs of customers. He has grown the Business Analysis team so that it can provide the necessary domain experience required by the agile development teams to create software which can facilitate R&D.

Before starting this role in January 2014, he was Product Manager for E-WorkBook for four years and worked in IDBS Global Professional Services for five years, responsible for deploying IDBS’ products both from a technical and project management perspective.

Prior to working at IDBS, Stuart completed a Post-Doctoral fellowship at the NIH and then worked for Ionix Pharmaceuticals. Stuart obtained his PhD in Pharmacology from the MRC National Institute for Medical Research (University of London).

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User testing on a shoestring – Dan Goodwin – Product Design 2016

User testing on a shoestring – Dan Goodwin, fffunction

 

 

User testing on a shoestring – Dan Goodwin, fffunction SLIDES

https://speakerdeck.com/bouncingdan/usability-testing-on-a-shoestring

Introductory

Interactive workshop (no computer)
Double session

Testing whatever you’re working on with real users is one of the best ways to uncover design issues and it doesn’t have to be expensive. Anyone involved in the design and development process for a product or service can run effective user tests if they follow some simple guidelines. This workshop will show you how.   

Testing with real users is a fantastic way to inform the design process for products and services. You can test just about anything at pretty much any point in the lifecycle of a product and learn loads doing it.

User testing can also be a great ‘gateway’ tool for bringing users into the design process. Get folks on your product team to watch a user trying to complete basic tasks with your thing and they’ll not only be stunned and enthused into fixing things, hopefully they’ll also be encouraged to get users at the centre of the design process (where they should be).

And what’s more amazing is that anyone on the team for your thing can run user tests. They don’t need to be expensive, time-consuming and difficult, they can be quick, cheap and easy. There are a few simple guidelines for user tests which apply to cheap, guerrilla tests as much as they do to expensive tests in lab.

This workshop will explain the benefits of user testing and move quickly into showing you how to plan, organise, and conduct a user test and how to share what you learn with your team. You’ll learn how and where user testing can be used, how you can incorporate it into your project methodology, and how it fits alongside other techniques for bringing users into the design process. Low budget tools for capturing, analysing, and sharing user tests (including those on mobile and touch devices) will be discussed. As it’s an interactive workshop, there will be some exercises to get you planning and conducting a user test. There will also be some discussion of what you might get if you take user testing into higher budget territory with participant recruitment, user testing labs and eye-tracking (and why you probably don’t need to).

Dan is the user experience director at fffunction, a user-centred design agency in the South West of the UK. With a background of fifteen years experience in agency and in-house software and web development, he is an all-rounder with strong technical and people skills in addition to user experience. He loves user research and bringing users and empathy for them into every step of a project.

Dan loves the sea and gets in it or near it whenever he gets the chance. He likes good coffee, good beer, and good and bad flapjacks.”

 

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