Business 2016

2016 Line up  ::  Software Delivery Track   ::   Agile Business Track   ::   Agile Teams and Practices Track   ::   Product Design and Management Track    ::   Bonus Doubles Track

Agile Business 2016

 

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daveleachMeasuring Agile success  – David Leach,  Leanintoagile.co.uk

Intermediate

How do we measure success in Agile? some would say it’s easy, just measure customer satisfaction, others (whilst perhaps misinformed) might look to try and compare development team velocity.

So what does a good metric look like? In this talk I will describe the metrics that can be used at the individual, team, department and organisation level and the impact on behaviour and performance of choosing a good metric and also the negative impact when choosing a poor metric.

The weight we lose when dieting is driven by the food we eat and the exercise we take i.e the actions and activities required to reach the “lagging” metric of weight loss or BMI reduction. Otherwise its just luck if we lose weight, how much to we rely on luck in business?”  

How do we measure success in Agile? some would say it’s easy just measure customer satisfaction, others whilst perhaps misinformed might look to try and compare development team velocity or lines of code of features created. A bad measure may negatively affect behaviours so we need to educate ourselves on what good measures look like and be prepared to inspect and adapt our measures and metrics.

So what does a good metric look like? In this talk I will describe the metrics that can be used at the individual, team, department and organisation level and the impact on behaviour and performance of choosing a good metric and also when choosing a poor metric.

The weight we lose when dieting is driven by the food we eat and the exercise we take i.e the actions and activities required to reach the “lagging” metric of weight loss or BMI reduction. Otherwise its just luck if we lose weight, how much to we rely on luck in business?

We utilise the balanced scorecard, lean finance and lean startup to help drive our knowledge and learning regarding good measures of success that drive continuous improvement, good behaviour, increased purpose and engagement.

Teams focusing on customers and continuous improvement, departments focusing on learning and innovation and the organization also focused on customers but carefully balanced with sustainability, cashflow and market share.

The use of vanity metrics boosts confidence short term but leads to longer term issues with an inability to spot changes in customer behaviour or market trends that could lead to disruption ending the organization’s ability to compete.

David Leach – Having spent 14 years in Digital teams in a number of different roles both on the business and IT “sides”, I am now Head of Agile Practice, leading the Lean and Agile coaching team.

I run the meetup Agile in Covent Garden. Co-host the London Lean coffee and I have a new blog agileleachy.uk
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andreapValue  –  Andrea Provaglio, Agile Transformation Coach

Intermediate

A voyage into the multidimensional, systemic and subjective nature of Value in software development, with the intent of providing ways to create a shared understanding of what’s “valuable” for all stakeholders.

In Agile we like to deliver valuable software to our customers on a regular basis. However, while it’s pretty clear what ‘software’ means, we cannot really say the same about ‘valuable’. The definition of Value in a project (with an uppercase “V”) is frequently fuzzy and confused.

Even within the same project, asking different stakeholders what Value means to them produces different answers; and the same stakeholder will likely provide different definitions of Value, depending on their perception and role in the project.

Most stakeholders will naturally associate Value to money, sometimes through surprisingly creative correlations; but there are other dimensions, equally valid, such as strategic positioning, company image, innovation and learning, and so forth.

Understanding the multidimensional nature of Value becomes therefore critical to drive the project to success.

However, the traditional approach to defining value stems either from a financial mindset or from and engineering mindset, and both may turn out to be incomplete or inadequate to address the complexity of the Agile projects we face and of the ecosystem in which they exist.
In this talk we’ll address what Value means in Agile for different stakeholders; how to map and categorize the stakeholders; how to describe Value on different dimension and how to track it; how to bring system awareness to your project’s definition of value. We’ll also see what happens when we don’t do that.

Andrea Provaglio : I help IT organizations to implement better ways of doing business; and I coach executives, managers and teams who want to improve technically and relationally.

My main focus is on helping companies to transition to organizational and cultural models that are better suited to the kind of knowledge work that’s so typical of software development — which includes, but it’s not limited to, Agile and Lean.

In over 20 years of professional experience, I had clients in three different continents and I worked with organizations ranging from the United Nations to small and dynamic IT companies.

Currently I work in Europe. I’ve also worked in the USA on a O-1 visa for “extraordinary abilities in Sciences”

As part of my regular activities, I enjoy sharing what I know by speaking at major international conferences. http://andreaprovaglio.com/about
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kamilaMindful Agile: The Foundation of How We Grow  – Kamila Piorowska

Intermediate

In this highly interactive workshop, we will share with you the concept and practice of Mindful Agile and how it can help you overcome the seemingly insurmountable challenges you face so that instead of having a mind that is constantly full, you can live a more effective life through mindfulness.

Are you overwhelmed by fear of uncertainty when it comes to delivering on your promises? Are you kept awake at night by endless streams of troubling thoughts? Do you doubt yourself and those around you?

In this highly interactive workshop, we will share with you the concept and practice of Mindful Agile and how it can help you overcome the seemingly insurmountable challenges you face so that instead of having a mind that is constantly full, you can live a more effective life through mindfulness.

Join us to learn about what mindfulness is, its benefits and practice techniques such as breathing and observational exercises as well as visualisation in order to become more effective in managing stressful situations during your Agile transformation and everyday life.

Kamila Piorowska – Kamila is a mindfulness teacher and Agile coach with experience in delivering Agile projects in a number of financial institutions. Kamila loves running Agile training sessions, coaching Scrum Masters and senior leaders. She currently works as an Agile coach in the central Agile Adoption Team of one of the world’s largest Agile transformation in the finance sector. Kamila is passionate about addressing resistance to change when scaling Agile in organisations which have historically been managed using command and control.

 

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paulmasseyCase Study: Seven Years of Agile – Paul Massey, Bluefruit

Introductory

Bluefruit Software adopted Agile seven years ago. Come and hear about the journey and some of the key lessons learnt along the way, including why Agile was adopted, how the transition occurred, top practices that made the biggest difference, how Agile affected our customer relationships and what the benefits have been.               

Paul Massey is the Founder and Managing Director of the UK’s leading embedded software specialists, Bluefruit Software. In 2009, Paul started Bluefruit on an Agile journey. Since then, the business has grown five-fold in size, successfully navigating many common growth challenges along the way. The transformation not only helped the business growth, but vastly improved the quality of the software produced, which in turn led to Bluefruit delivering much more value to their clients, resulting in better clients and stronger relationships.

In his talk, Paul will take you through their Agile journey starting with initial triggers for change, exploring the big changes made in the first years followed by the longer term cultural changes. Paul will also describe how Agile affected the layers within the business from the guiding principles in the business strategy, through the project management practices, right down to the technical practices. Along the way Paul will highlight the big wins such as TDD and BDD; and touch on some more complex subjects such as estimating and contracts.

Adopting Agile doesn’t just affect the business’ internal processes, but also has an impact on customers and suppliers. Paul will describe how these relationships evolved and what the impacts of these changes were to everyone involved.

Paul has been programming commercially since his teenage years, and is the leader at the top of the Bluefruit tree. He held various roles within the software industry before starting his own business in 2000, Absolute Software Ltd.

This small embedded software development company enjoyed 50% growth year on year, thanks to Paul’s “Quality First” vision and innovative use of Agile methodologies. In 2014, the company underwent a complete rebrand, changing its trading name to Bluefruit Software, and celebrated its £1mil turnover milestone!

Because of his experience in business, and his passion for growing the local economy, Paul is also chair of the Cornwall Employment Skills board, and a board member of The Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Local Enterprise Partnership.

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jonterryDoes this FizzGood? Learn how to improve velocity, predictability & agility – Jon Terry, LeanKit

Intermediate

Come learn how (and why) to apply the FSGD (Frequent Small Good Decoupled) technique to effectively break down work. This LeanKit way of working provides teams with a simple yardstick for making effective decisions to allow rapid, continuous delivery without a lot of cross team scheduling and coordination. It simplifies abstract Lean-Agile concepts into something everyone can easily understand and cheerfully apply on a daily basis.    

LeanKit’s founding team had a strong Lean-Agile background from previous careers. So, in the early days of the company, we just instinctively did things in a Lean way with as few formal processes as any startup. But, like any growing company, we eventually did have to start clearly defining how we do things. And like anyone, we were tempted to become more bureaucratic – with lots of scheduling, coordination, meetings and estimates.

Instead, we developed our FSGD (Frequent Small Good Decoupled) approach. This LeanKit way of working has provided our teams with a simple yardstick for making effective decisions without a lot of cross team scheduling and coordination. It has simplified abstract Lean-Agile concepts into something everyone easily understands and cheerfully applies on a daily basis.

FSGD isn’t a replacement for Kanban, Scrum, XP, etc. We strongly believe in and spend lots of time teaching our teams about the Kanban Method as well as standard Lean and Agile principles, tools, and techniques.

But FSGD distills what we think are the key decision making elements of those methods into something everyone can remember. It’s been a crucial part of allowing us to be a continuous delivery organization, as important as containers and automation.

We have seen significant improvements in our delivery speed across multiple teams, including both software and business teams, since rolling out the FSGD approach. We’ll share those results with the audience so they can get started learning to do the right thing by doing what Fizz-Good.

Jon Terry is Chief Operating Officer of LeanKit. Before LeanKit, Jon held a number of senior IT positions with hospital-giant HCA and its logistics subsidiary, HealthTrust Purchasing Group. He was among those responsible for launching HCA’s adoption of Lean/Agile methods. Jon earned his Global Executive MBA from Georgetown University and ESADE Business School in Barcelona, Spain, and his Masters Certificate in Project Management from George Washington University. He is a Project Management Professional, a Certified Scrum Master, a Kanban Coaching Professional, is certified in the Lean Construction Institute’s Last Planner Method, and trained in the SAFe Lean Systems Engineering method.i
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stuartwardCan you be agile and compliant? – Stuart Ward, IDBS

Introductory

What happens when you take an organisation, which has been using waterfall for 25 years, to the new world of agile? In 2015, IDBS transformed how it creates software, which is used by a number of business verticals including regulated pharmaceutical environments, to facilitate R&D. This session will show how the move to agile was implemented along with the benefits and challenges seen.    

IDBS produces software for a number of business verticals, which includes regulated environments (GxP and 21 CFR Part 11) in the pharmaceutical industry, to facilitate R&D.

At the beginning of 2015 IDBS’ 100 strong Product Delivery team (Developers, Testers & Business Analysts) moved exclusively to an agile engineering culture. This was a massive change to the organisation which had used a waterfall approach up to that point.

There were big questions around whether the move to agile would impact software quality, speed to market and the overall effectiveness of IDBS’ Product Delivery organisation. Would the Product Managers get the products that they needed and on time? What would be the impact on IDBS’ customers and the rest of the organisation? Did IDBS have the skills and capacity to run agile development teams and how would people need to adapt?

On top of all of this, IDBS had a robust quality management process, would the change to agile affect the outcome of customer audits? Would the software still meet regulatory needs? The expectations were high and everyone was watching!

The move to agile has had a positive and significant impact on IDBS and the way it does business. There have been challenges along the way: some obvious and some surprising. More than 12 months on from the initial change, agile is still impacting how IDBS creates and sells software: from the adoption of new product delivery tools/processes to drive efficiency, to how the customer facing parts of the organisation present and use the software. This session will present how IDBS approached the move to agile and what has happened in the new world.

Stuart is Head of Business Analysis, responsible for ensuring that IDBS products meet the needs of customers. He has grown the Business Analysis team so that it can provide the necessary domain experience required by the agile development teams to create software which can facilitate R&D.

Before starting this role in January 2014, he was Product Manager for E-WorkBook for four years and worked in IDBS Global Professional Services for five years, responsible for deploying IDBS’ products both from a technical and project management perspective.

Prior to working at IDBS, Stuart completed a Post-Doctoral fellowship at the NIH and then worked for Ionix Pharmaceuticals. Stuart obtained his PhD in Pharmacology from the MRC National Institute for Medical Research (University of London).
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gezsmithAgile Marketing: The Incomplete Guide  –  Gez Smith, Bunny Picnic Ltd

Introductory

For years, marketers have used up-front planning and specification to launch campaigns in a single big bang. This worked in predictable and well-understood environments, like TV and press advertising, but the Internet has now made marketing far more complex, fast-paced and uncertain. As a result, the old approaches often don’t work, and the answer may lie in agile.

Based on Gez’s research at Bristol University and 10 years experience of using agile in marketing and comms environments, this talk looks at how agile can be used in marketing, and the potential blockers to making it a reality.

The history of modern marketing and communications can be traced back to the end of World War II, the same time as big waterfall style approaches to delivering projects were being developed in the military, construction and space industries. It seems no coincidence that marketing has been a linear, waterfall-based industry ever since, full of hierarchy, personal opinion, subjective awards and big bang launches. There’s even a whole army of people in marketing departments called ‘planners’.

This was fine when marketing was happening in a stable and predictable environment, with few new channels emerging, and customers consuming your marketing in places you could predict. In the last 10 years though, the rise of digital and the Internet has caused dozens of new channels to emerge, and caused customers to become your media suppliers through sharing your content on social media, all at a much faster pace of change than ever before. On top of this, the rise of mobile means your customers could be consuming your marketing anywhere at any time, and the rise of big data means you can finally target and understand customers to huge degrees of detail and complexity.

Faced with this new complex, fast-paced and uncertain marketing environment, I believe marketers need to adopt the agile mindset software developers have been using to deal with these issues for years. But how does agile work in marketing? If all the agile frameworks are for software development, which one should marketers choose? Do marketers need to invent a whole new framework? Besides, how do you get an industry that always puts the best spin on things to begin to celebrate failure when failing fast?

It seems clear that marketers and communicators moving into digital need to adopt agile. It’s not yet at all clear how they should do so.

Gez is a Certified Scrum Master and Certified Scrum Professional who has been working with agile and scrum for over 10 years, for clients including 10 Downing Street, the BBC Trust, Lloyds Banking Group and Glastonbury Festival. After two years postgraduate research into agile at Bristol University, from the perspectives of strategy, organizational change, leadership and marketing, in early 2016 he published his second book, titled “Agile Marketing: The Incomplete Guide”. You can download for free from www.bunnypicnic.co.uk/book.

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corinnaAgile accountants and other rare specimen – Corinna Baldauf, sipgate

Introductory

Tired of IT being an agile island? At sipgate, the agile mindset spread to all parts of the company: from HR over Accounting to kitchen staff. Let’s explore 10 examples of how agile thinking manifests throughout everyday company life. Look forward to strategy retreats for all, pairing everywhere, peer feedback and many more!    

Tired of IT being an agile island? At sipgate, the agile mindset spread to all parts of the company: from HR over Accounting to kitchen staff. Let’s explore 10 examples of how agile thinking manifests throughout everyday company life. Look forward to strategy retreats for all, pairing everywhere, peer feedback and many more!

Corinna Baldauf [http://finding-marbles.com/] has tried on every Scrum role for size and is happiest as a developer. She strives to make things useful, simple and beautiful for sipgate.de [http://sipgate.de] and as well as her private projects.

Her most popular creation is Retromat [http://plans-for-retrospectives.com/]. She hopes that Wall-Skills.com [http://wall-skills.com/] will be equally well known some day.

If you want to make Corinna laugh, tell her a pun. Any pun will do, even bad ones. Okay, especially bad ones. Try it. Just look out for her vibrantly colored hair.

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draganjRising to the Agility Challenge –   Dragan Jojic

Intermediate

Organisational agility could be the difference between succeeding and failing. It relies on everybody in the organisation knowing what they are doing and why, and deciding by themselves how to best do it. This talk will look at how a company can rise to ‘the agility challenge’ by evolving the themes covered in my InfoQ article with the same name.

Organisational agility could be the difference between succeeding and failing in today’s business environment. Agility relies on everybody in an organisation knowing what they are trying to achieve, understanding why, being able to decide by themselves how to best do it and, most importantly, genuinely caring that it gets done. This is what I call ‘the agility challenge’.

What does a company need to do to rise to that challenge? What structural and cultural barriers does it have to overcome on the way? And what interventions could help navigate this journey?

During the talk, we will look for answers to these questions. We will also suggest how to encourage leadership at all levels in the organisation and facilitate the emergence of ‘everyday leaders’. The talk is based on ‘The Agility Challenge’ article that I wrote for InfoQ, taking some of the themes, such as visualising an organisation’s culture and value-based change, and evolving them further.

Dragan has over 30 years of technology and business coaching, consulting and project management experience gained with a variety of products and services organisations. Over the past ten years, his primary focus was on Agile and business change consulting with banking, insurance and online gaming clients. His specialist area of interest is organisational agility and the culture needed to support it.

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The Agile Business – DSDM – Ed Holt

Ed Holt3dsdm-logo-2015-pantone-RGB

 

 

 

 

With the advent of the inter-connected ‘Digital Age’ there is growing pressure on the wider business (beyond IT) to act in a nimble, responsive, agile way – and this represents an essential opportunity to become ‘The Agile Business’. Ed was the Founding Chairman of the DSDM Consortium and was closely involved in its early work as an IT-focussed method. He has recently been undertaking market research on the spread and scope of ‘agile’ into the wider enterprise. This session summarises the findings and points the way for organisations to collaborate to create ‘The Agile Business’.   

The Agile Business
The DSDM Consortium is rooted in the promotion of a framework and agile techniques for the delivery of IT projects, and has a successful 20 year track record of thought leadership and practical deliverables. With the advent of the inter-connected ‘Digital Age’ there is growing pressure on the wider business (beyond IT) to act in a nimble, responsive, agile way – and this represents an opportunity to support ‘The Agile Business’.
Ed was the Founding Chairman of the DSDM Consortium and was closely involved in its early work as an IT-focussed method. He has recently been undertaking market research on the spread and scope of ‘agile’ into the wider enterprise.
He will start with a presentation of the market research, leading to a workshop session, with discussion on range of topics including:
*        The DSDM Consortium – Timeline
*        The Context: Drivers for C-Level Executives
*        Definition of the ‘Agile Organisation’
*        Findings from Academic Research
*        The Business Benefits of Organisational Agility
*        Critical Factors in Agile
*        Supply Side: Agile Service Providers
*        Potential Agile Market Offers
*        Open Discussion

Ed is a ‘seasoned’ (ie old!) executive with a 30 year track record in the software industry covering both large scale applications (at IBM leader MSA) and software development (4GL / OO / Component / CASE – you name it!). He was instrumental in the founding of the DSDM Consortium over 20 years ago, when it led the drive for responsive software development – this was the very early days of ‘agile’ even though it wasn’t called that in those days!
Since 1994 the not-for-profit Consortium has been evolving an industry standard for building IT systems in an iterative (agile) way. The Consortium was set up by a small group of suppliers and customers at a time when Agile methodology was a niche approach to running projects, but DSDM wanted to prove to a wider audience that an Agile approach can deliver the business value from projects that bosses demand. And in the last 20 years there have been hundreds of organisations of all sizes running thousands of projects using DSDM to great effect, delivering what the users wanted in a responsive manner.
As first chairman of the consortium, Ed now sees a trend to take Agile into the wider business, beyond ‘just’ IT projects

 

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Positive Disruption & Agile Trouble Making – Nigel Barker – MPAD

nigel mpadnew

From an early age we are taught to avoid causing trouble. Don’t rock the boat, people don’t like fuss. We are conditioned NOT to question but to follow. The question “Why?” is being replaced by “OK.” “What happens if?” is giving way to “We have to do it that way.” But without trouble makers the human race wouldn’t have evolved.  We should thank the trouble makers, not shun them.

Positive disruption is the process of deliberately rocking the boat, challenging perception, questioning ideas and practices to improve the outcomes.

From an early age we are taught to avoid causing trouble. People don’t like fuss. We are conditioned NOT to question but to follow. The question “Why?” is being replaced by “OK.” “What happens if?” is giving way to “We have to do it that way.” Yet the only thing that is inevitable in life is change. The world needs trouble makers to progress.

Every single new idea, innovation or invention has been created by a trouble maker.  Not all trouble makers work for the betterment of things but positive disruptors are constantly looking to the future, horizon scanning and trying to predict future patterns, technologies and trends. Positive disruptors want to create a better tomorrow, they react to change by nature, set in stone processes are the established paradigm and therefore redundant. Positive disruptors ARE Agile by definition.  This session will be fun, interactive and with any luck will create some good old fashioned disruption.

Nigel has worn many hats in his career, from systems architect to journalist to radio presenter.

He now resides in the world of story telling using whatever tools are available and appropriate to the audience.  As The Positive Disruptor Nigel draws from Neitzsche: “All great things must first wear terrifying and monstrous masks in order to inscribe themselves on the hearts of humanity.”

View more sessions

2016 Line up  ::  Software Delivery Track   ::   Agile Business Track   ::   Agile Teams and Practices Track   ::   Product Design and Management Track    ::   Bonus Doubles Track

 

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