Build in Quality, Jo Cranford, Software Delivery 2016

Build in Quality, Jo Cranford

Jo Cranford    Build In Quality

Short synopsis: After months of hacking things together, small changes often break a dozen other features. Even with every refactoring technique in the book, it’s going to be incredibly hard to improve unless you can make increasing quality part of your team’s development process. This talk discusses what constitutes “good code”, with practical to bring code quality and craftsmanship into your development lifecycle.

Bio: Jo is a lead developer at Culture Amp, the world’s leading culture analytics platform. Before her current role, Jo worked at the likes of Lonely Planet, Atlasssian, ThoughtWorks and Expedia, in roles such as Product Planner, Senior Business Analyst, Development Manager and Chief Technical Officer. She was also a CTO of an Australian startup accepted into Telstra’s Muru-D program. Jo is an experienced Ruby developer, a strong advocate of clean code and good tests, and has been working in agile teams for over ten years. She is passionate about increased diversity in the tech industry. When she’s not at her computer she can be found running around the Tan, or biking along the beach.

Long synopsis: With the exception of students, I have never met a developer who hasn’t had to work on a codebase that has areas of poorly written, untested code, at least once in their life. Making changes becomes incredibly painful and error prone, when changing code in one place has effects in seemingly unrelated areas. There are a lot of amazing resources on refactoring techniques, but without the support of a team who makes quality a priority, any improvement in quality is soon overtaken by careless hacks. With a development process that supports ongoing management and tracking of quality, refactoring can be spread out over time, the team can be confident that their efforts are being spent in the right places, and they waste less time justifying ‘refactoring’ cards or stories that don’t appear to have business value. Not only is work far more enjoyable and rewarding when we write “good” code, but over time, making changes becomes faster and easier. This talk discusses what constitutes “good code”, with practical to bring code quality and craftsmanship into your development lifecycle.